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/Rob Lawrence

About Rob Lawrence

Shark expert Rob Lawrence, together with his wife Karen and their dedicated team in Simon’s Town, Cape Town. Rob, also known as shark legend Rob or Captain Rob has been working with great white sharks for the last 20 years and has dedicated his life to the great white shark.

Let’s Talk About It, The Orca

By | March 24th, 2017|Tour Happening's|

Let’s Talk About It, The Orca   With all the “boo-ha-ha” in Gansbaai, regarding the appearance of 4 Orcas in the bay, which seemed to coincide with the disappearance of the Great White Shark population from the famous Shark Alley, I thought I would take a deeper look into this phenomenon, of course only once the sharks had returned. There seems to be differing beliefs here, some on the side of the Orca, saying they are not responsible for the disappearance of the Great Whites, as they are not a threat and others who believe they are a threat and the sole reason for the Great White Shark’s game of hide and go seek. Both sides have a fair argument and both have proof to back up their claims. In False Bay in 2014, ASEC had many successful trips, filled with plenty shark activity out to Seal Island, and the [...]

Let’s Talk About It…Sandbar Shark

By | March 8th, 2017|Tour Happening's|

Let’s Talk About It…Sandbar Shark The Sandbar Shark is found in temperate and tropical waters, from the Western Atlantic, between Massachusetts and southern Brazil; in the eastern Atlantic from Portugal to Zaire; and in the Indo-Pacific from South Africa, our very own False Bay and KZN to the Galapagos and from Vietnam to New Caledonia. Also occurring in the Red Sea and Mediterranean, this shark is gorgeous. Not taking anything away from the others, but this little guy is just a stocky, solid shark, makes me think of a Staffie. He gets his name from being blue-greyish brown in colour with a paler underside, as with most sharks. He grows to a maximum of 2.4 meters (240 centimetres or 94 inches) and has a large dorsal fin for its body! He has almost cat-like eyes, and a lovely smile. His skin is thick and tough, which sadly makes it a [...]

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Fresh to Depth

By | March 8th, 2017|Interesting Articles|

Fresh to Depth Have you ever wondered what crazy person would want to put a cage in the deep blue sea? Full of sharks?? So who decided to drop a cage in a sharks den? And what does this have to do with Steven Spielberg’s movie Jaws and lions??? The history of the “invention” - or rather adaptation of the cage is quite interesting. Looking back to where it all began, the year was 1940 and Rodney Fox was born in Adelaide, Australia, he is an avid sea enthusiast with many feats include fishing, spearfishing and catching lobsters. This progressed whereby he became the 1962 South Australian Spearfishing Champion. A year later, on December 8th 1963, four months after 25-year-old life insurance salesman Rodney married his wife Kay, he re-entered the South Australian Spearfishing Championship to defend his title at Aldinga Beach, 50 kilometres away from Adelaide. While stalking large [...]

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Let’s Talk About Shark Cage Diving with ASEC

By | February 17th, 2017|Tour Happening's|

Let’s Talk About Shark Cage Diving with ASEC BE A PART OF THE GREAT WHITE SHARK “ULTIMATE AIRJAWS” EXPERIENCE AND JOIN US ON ONE OF OUR COMBINATION TRIPS OUT OF FALSE BAY – SIMONS TOWN Book the ultimate in adventure experiences with a combination Great White Shark breaching, viewing and cage dive trip out of Simons Town, which is a mere 45 mins drive from the centre of Cape Town. Take the Great White Shark cage dive to another level with scuba, no experience necessary as we make use of the Hookah method, but a rudimentary understanding and swimming ability is a must. We pride ourselves in our eco-friendly approach and passion of the Great Whites and their natural predatory behaviour. Our trips offer insights into this wonderful world of the Great White Shark, from both the boat and cage, with a wealth of knowledge to be shared, from our [...]

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Natural predations witnessed while shark cage diving

By | January 13th, 2017|Tour Happening's|

Natural predations witnessed while shark cage diving On many of our shark cage diving trips, we get to witness the rare and phenomenal natural predation events that Seal Island, False Bay has to offer. Predation is one of the most fundamental interactions in nature and one of the most fascinating interactions to observe, but predation is rarely observed in the wild. Seal Island, in False Bay, South Africa, provides unique opportunities to observe natural predation by Great White Sharks on Cape Fur Seals, and to observe social interactions among both species. Breaching is one of the hunting techniques that great white sharks use to surprise and kill its prey. They  surface with such force and explosive energy that it propels the shark right out of the water. The great white shark will try and catch the young smaller inexperienced seals. Not every breach leads to a successful kill. If the great [...]

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Let’s Talk About It…The Spotted Ragged Tooth

By | December 1st, 2016|Tour Happening's|

Let’s Talk About It…The Spotted Ragged Tooth Spotted Ragged Tooth Shark, the name alone creates a vision of some scary teeth, while Grey Nurse Shark, seems to send thoughts completely in the opposite direction, and Sand Tiger Shark, is kind of just in the middle there, and yet, all of these names belong to one shark! One shark that is found from Australia to the US and False Bay to Durban! The Spotted Ragged Tooth enjoys the temperate to tropical coastal waters of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. In South Africa, they really love the Eastern and Southern coasts. These beautiful sharks, grow to approximately 3.3 meters in length, with a rather wide girth and small dorsal fin, it’s pretty easy to distinguish. Besides, it has spots! The shark is a beautiful beige, almost golden colour with darker brown spots along its torso, and as with other sharks, it [...]

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Let’s Talk About It…Puffadder Shyshark

By | November 24th, 2016|Interesting Articles|

Let’s Talk About It…Puffadder Shyshark Found in False Bay, amongst other areas in the Western Cape through to Angola, this shark is a species of catshark! What? Catshark, really? Yes, really and not because it looks like this! It is also known as a “Happy Eddie” but that is easier to explain, as its scientific name is Haploblepharus Edwardsii, you can see how that came to pass right? A small shark, growing to a maximum of 60cm in length (24 inches), it can be found at depth of up to 130 meters (426 feet) in rocky bottoms or habitats. It is slender with a flattened body and head and covered in little white spots all over its back. Various hues of brown are patched onto its little body. Not to be confused with the Natal Shyshark, or “Happy Kitty” as it is sometimes referred to … Haploblepharus Kistnasamyi, get it? [...]

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Let’s Talk About It…Shortfin Mako Shark

By | November 24th, 2016|Interesting Articles|

Let’s Talk About It…Shortfin Mako Shark Another amazing shark to be found in the waters +- 25 miles off from False Bay amongst other temperate waters is the Shortfin Mako. Not to be confused with its cousin, the Longfin Mako; which grows to an average of 4.5 meters, the Shortfin Mako grows to a maximum of 2.5 meters weighing in at approximately 100 kilograms. As is the fact of the Longfin Mako, the Shortfin Mako is also exceptionally fast, the cheetah of the ocean if you will, reaching and surpassing 97 kph (60 mph) for extended periods of time. Sometimes confused for a smaller version of the Great White Shark, a major identifying factor, are its scary razor sharp and strange looking teeth, which even when the Mako closes its mouth, are still visible! And even though “Flash Gordon” of the seven seas, looks scary, with those teeth, there are [...]

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Let’s Talk About It…Pajama Shark

By | November 10th, 2016|Tour Happening's|

Let’s Talk About It…Pyjama Shark   The Pajama Shark, not to be confused with Shark Pajamas or a shark in pajamas, is another arm of the Catshark family and is also known by Striped Catfish. Boasting a broad, flat head, with a blunt snout, this grey shark has the distinct markings of grandad’s stripped pajamas, with darker longitudinal strips running from head to tail, though broken the closer one gets to the tail. The underside of the Pyjama Shark is uniformly pale. With two little “feeler” type barbels above the mouth, that assist in foraging for prey, which includes smaller fish, crustaceans, molluscs and worms, they boast broad and rounded pectoral fins, two small dorsal fins that are set further back towards the tail. The Pajama Shark grows to a maximum of 1 meter (3.2 feet) in length and is endemic to the waters of the South African coast, ranging [...]

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Let’s Talk About It…Bronze Whaler Shark

By | October 27th, 2016|Interesting Articles|

Let’s Talk About It…Bronze Whaler Shark   Proudly found in the waters of False Bay, South Africa amongst other regions, where the waters are above 12 degrees Celsius, the Bronze Whaler Shark is also known by Copper Shark, or Narrowtooth Shark. Why the “Bronze Whaler” perhaps it’s because it has a bronze ridge between its dorsal fins, ‘cos other than that, it really doesn’t have much in the way of distinguishing marks. Why “Narrowtooth”, perhaps it has something to do with the fact that they have narrow, hook shaped teeth. “Copper Shark”, because out of the water, it has a sandy copper hue to its flesh, sometimes it looks a little like a dark gold as the sun catches it. Though not predatory towards humans, this 3.3 meter shark can get a little excited when eating its diet of small bony fish, cartilaginous fish and other cephalopods. Though not an [...]

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