Interesting Articles

/Interesting Articles

Great White Sharks

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Breaching Great White Sharks of False Bay, South Africa The Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) is the shark of all sharks. It is beautifully streamlined to slip through the water with minimum effort. Its enormous size, powerful jaws that can extend almost like an outreaching hand, rows of large triangular teeth, and jet-black eyes make it one of the most feared creatures on the planet. It is the ultimate super predator. Great White Sharks seem to be strongly visual predators and are the only fish known to spy-hop; lifting their heads out of the water, apparently to look around for prey. They will hunt deep diving Cape Fur Seals, but most of their attacks take place on the surface without warning, from below and behind. They can even breach right out of the water in pursuit of prey. Their teeth hit first and they protect their eyes from [...]

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Predation of the Great White Shark

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Natural predation by Great White Sharks on Cape Fur Seals Predation of the Great White Shark Predation is one of the most fundamental interactions in nature and one of the most fascinating interactions to observe, but predation is rarely observed in the wild. Seal Island, in False Bay, South Africa, provides unique opportunities to observe natural predation by Great White Sharks on Cape Fur Seals and to observe social interactions among both species. Methods used in the study of the Great White Sharks and Cape Fur Seals As part of a larger study instigated by Rob Lawrence of African Shark Eco-Charters and a colleague, predator-prey interactions between Great White Sharks and Cape Fur Seals at Seal Island, False Bay, South Africa, were investigated by direct observations of ad libidem encounters between these two species at the surface during August and September 2000. Predatory events were usually first detected [...]

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“Shark Cage Diving Special” for the Argus Cycle Tour

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Great White Shark approaching the guests in the cage If you or your family are planning on coming down to Cape Town to do the Argus Cycle Tour, why not do a shark cage diving trip? We run our trips from Simonstown, only 40 minutes from Cape Town, so there is no need to travel 2.5 hrs to see Great White Sharks. Shark Cage diving is fun, it’s safe and you are getting up close and personal with the oceans super predator, the magnificent Great White Shark. We operate small groups only, (maximum 12). No dive experience necessary! Although March is still early in the shark season, your chances of seeing sharks are over 70%, and you may even see the Great White Shark breach, although this occurs generally from May onwards. Trips depart Simonstown Pier 07h00 sharp returning at 12.45 What to bring Rain jacket Sunglasses Sunscreen [...]

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Interesting Great White Shark Facts

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Great White Shark displaying the unique ability of breaching out of the water There are roughly 400 shark species that exist, but only four present an innate danger to human beings. They are: Great White Sharks, Tiger Sharks, Bull Sharks, and the Hammerhead Sharks.   Sharks have long been maligned by humankind as some kind of ‘man-eating monster’ of the ocean. These inaccurate perceptions have been fueled by far-fetched Hollywood movies that have created a largely uneducated outlook of these magnificent creatures. Many shark species do pose potential danger to humans, however, it must be acknowledged that sharks are not out to hunt humans. On the contrary, the actions of humans in recent years have posed a major threat to the survival of the shark species. That is why shark cage diving tour operators such as African Shark Eco-Charters do all they can to educate visitors about sharks, [...]

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Best places to see Great White Sharks

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Seal Island in False Bay, South Africa is the best place to see the breaching Great White Shark The Great White Shark is one of the most widely distributed of all sharks and has been sighted in almost every region of the globe from cold seas to the tropics, and from coastal to oceanic seas. They are mainly found between the latitudes of 60° North and 60° South, in waters ranging in temperature between 14° C and 24° C. Research has shown that Great White Sharks do not remain long in any particular place, and instead will only stay in a certain region for a few weeks on end. Great White Sharks are also capable of extensive open ocean voyages, covering vast distances around the globe. Generally the Great White Shark is considered rare in most places it occurs, but there are a handful of places around the [...]

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AIRJAWS

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

The "flying" Great Whites of False Bay - as seen on Airjaws 1 & 2 Airjaws 1 and 2 is the most successful shark show ever made by Discovery Channel, and it concentrates on the “flying” great white sharks of Seal Island, False Bay, South Africa. The boat it was filmed on was the ‘Blue Pointer”, operated by Rob Lawrence of African Shark Eco-Charters. According to Rodney Fox, Peter Benchley and Rocky Strong, as well as the whole National Geographic film crew who were out with us in 1999, they believe it to be the best place on the planet to see natural predator-prey interaction as well as other unique behaviours such as Great White Shark breaching. Rob helped produce and starred in “Air Jaws”. Since then the Discovery Channel has completed filming on “Air Jaws II” with him, and African Shark Eco-Charters has facilitating several international film crews [...]

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Anti-Predatory Strategies of Cape Fur Seals at Seal Island

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Great Whites often sport numerous scratches on their heads, most likely caused by seals defending themselves during predatory events. From direct observation and data collected, Cape Fur Seals apparently reduce their vulnerability to Great White Sharks by: taking advantage of the expanded vigilance of entire groups. Sub-surface vigilance while rafting is accomplished via assuming a head-down posture, with only the tail and the tip of the rear flippers showing above the surface. leaving Seal Island as co-ordinated groups of 8 to 12 animals. Multiple groups – ranging from 2 to as many as 5 - leave the island at intervals of approximately 45 seconds. single or small groups (2-5) of individuals executing a finely controlled zig-zaging evasive maneuver when a Great White Shark is spotted stalking below them. This tactic is referred to as “working the shark”. when an individual is actively pursued by a Great White Shark, [...]

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Predatory strategies of Great White Sharks at Seal Island

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Great Whites will often target lone Cape Fur Seals during predatory events. From direct observation and data collected, hunting White Sharks apparently: stalk surface-swimming Cape Fur Seals from near the bottom, probably relying on camouflage afforded by the murky water and the dark, rocky bottom against which their dark dorsal surfaces render the predators all but or wholly invisible. Direct observation indicated that Great White Sharks at Seal Island were very difficult or impossible to detect visually below a depth of about 2.5 metres, and that all recorded attacks took place in water at least 6 metres deep. target young seals, which are presumably less experienced at predator avoidance and smaller than are older seals. This probably makes them easier to catch, overpower, and consume. target lone or small groups (2-6) of seals which may be more vulnerable due to limited vigilance capabilities of such a small group. [...]

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What do sharks eat?

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Cape Fur Seals form a main part of the Great White Shark's diet Thanks to the media and films like "Jaws" and Shark Tale", there seems to be the perception amongst the general public that humans form part of the staple diet of all sharks. This misconception is especially true for the Great White Shark, which has received the worst press as far as being blamed for human attacks goes. Despite this perception, nothing could be farther from the truth. Some studies have determined that Great White Sharks only attack if they are feeling threatened, wereas other studies have shown that most attacks on humans are a case of mistaken identity. It is thought that humans on surfboards resemble seals or turtles on the surface of the water to the Great White Shark, of which both animals form part of their main diet. As one of the ocean's [...]

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Shark Cage Diving in Gansbaai – Cape Town

By | February 24th, 2015|Interesting Articles|

Shark Cage Diving in Gansbaai - Cape Town Shark cage diving is a must-do. There are two shark area's. Gansbaai and Simon's Town. Gansbaai: During the Summer (October to end February ), it is the low- intermediate  season and we would recommend shark cage diving at Gansbaai instead of Simon's Town (Seal Island, False Bay). Reason being, is that  in False Bay the great white sharks move away from Seal Island  to the inshore area's. False Bay: During the Winter, high season, we would recommend booking with us in Simon's Town (Seal Island, False Bay). Shark cage diving - Gansbaai, Cape Town, ( 2hrs from Cape Town), is done in a narrow channel called Shark Alley, which is the open stretch of water between Dyer Island and nearby Geyser Island. Although this is low season for shark activity in South Africa, "Shark Alley" in Gansbaai still produces activity that is worth viewing. We can book [...]

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