African Shark Eco-Charters

/Tag:African Shark Eco-Charters

Don’t Get Mouthy…

By | August 16th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

  Don't get mouthy When you hear the words “Megamouth Shark”, what is the image it conjures? If you think big, nay huge mouth, well then you would be correct. It stands to reason, if it has a huge mouth, it has to have a rather large frame to fit it into, and again you would be correct. This is one of the largest shark species, being out grown only by the likes of Whale Sharks and the controversial Megalodon Sharks. Despite its massive size and mouth, this shark sports very small teeth, as it is a filter feeder, swimming open mouthed through the depths swallowing jellyfish and plankton that are attracted to it by the luminescent photophore surrounding its mouth. It has fleshy “lips” and a broad rounded snout, which has confused some observers into believing that they were in fact seeing a baby killer whale. Little is known [...]

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Let’s Talk About Wobbegong Sharks…

By | August 16th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

A wabba, wabba, what you say? You heard me, it’s a Wabbegong Shark! You would be forgiven for thinking it was a part of the seabed, an ocean floor carpet, if you will, so much so, this is another name for this interesting little fella’.   The Wobbegong Shark is a bottom dweller, covering the oceans beds like rugs, hence the name “Carpet Shark”. There are 12 different species of Carpet Shark, and they all prefer shallow, temperate waters, but one, the Japanese Wobbegong, which is found in the far Northern oceans of Japan.   Most Wobbegong Sharks grow to a max length of +/- 1 and ¼ meters, whereas the Spotted and Banded Wabbegongs can reach lengths of up to 3 meters! They are masters at camouflage, and lie in wait of their prey, which consists of smaller fish, that dare to swim too close.     The name [...]

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Some More About Sharks…

By | August 2nd, 2015|Tour Happening's|

Well, it’s been a week since my last entry, in which we touched on the Ragged Tooth, the Mako, Greenland and Epaulette Sharks. This time, I want to chat about Mick Fanning and his “shark attack” in Jeffery’s Bay. I think the hype is almost past, so now, as an amateur, I want to dissect this “attack” and see just how much danger Mick was really in. First off, let me say that I can well imagine the utter, paralyzing fear that he experienced at the time of the “attack”, I mean a Great White Shark is considered the apex predator of the ocean, and I think we all breathe a little easier knowing they can’t come out of the sea and walk on land, right? This is the perfect shark, incorporating the speed of the Mako (maybe not as fast, but dam near close enough), the strength of the [...]

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Just A Couple Important Things To Remember When Booking / Taking A Shark Trip

By | July 19th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

It is heart breaking as a shark trip operator when we have to cancel trips due to unfavourable weather conditions, but as we believe in Safety First, there are times we simply have no other option. What makes it even more upsetting, is when the guest is unable to reschedule because they are leaving in a day or two. As a result, I have put together a couple tips, for both booking and taking a shark trip. When Booking: Always book a shark trip at the beginning of your holiday – actually any weather dependant trip or tour, so you are able to reschedule if you have to, especially if you have centred your entire vacation around your trip Weather is unpredictable, but as far as possible, try to book in the better weather months, if the trips are offered Do your homework around the operator – check reviews and [...]

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Facts about Cape Fur Seals

By | July 2nd, 2015|Tour Happening's|

Seal Blog: Team Seal Here are some Cape Fur Seal Facts I bet you didn’t know about! Here in the Southern Peninsula, our resident seals are the Cape Fur Seals. We do find other seal Sub-species along our coastline, such as the Leopard Seal, Elephant Sea and Sub-Antarctic Seal, however the Cape Furs are the only ones know to breed down here. Interestingly enough the Cape Fur Seal and the Australian Fur Seal are almost identical, their only differences being the geographical ranges. The Cape Fur is an eared Seal, unlike other seal species. On our trips out to Seal Island we come across hundreds and thousands of Cape Furs, either making their way back to the Island, coming from it, or breeding and relaxing on the rocky structure they call home. I find it particularly interesting how these marine mammals are adapted to escape the ever clutching jaws of [...]

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Mako Sharks

By | June 21st, 2015|Tour Happening's|

The Mako shark is the fastest swimming shark in the world at 40 kilometres per hour, attaining burst speeds up to 70 kilometres per hour. Most individuals are between 1.5 and 2.5 metres in length but large females up to 4 metres have been previously recorded. This species is found in temperate and tropical (17-22 degree Celsius) waters up to 500 metres in depth. These sharks, like white sharks, are adapted to life in these cool waters and have a heat exchange system in their body that keeps their muscles and internal temperature above that of the surrounding cool waters. This adaptation allows these sharks to maintain a high degree of activity. These sharks are top predators that prey on various fish species as well as sea turtles, dolphins and occasionally marine debris.  Females are slow maturing at approximately 19 years, while males mature much sooner, at 8 years. Between [...]

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Fantastic Experience with African Shark Eco-Charters

By | June 18th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

“A fantastic experience!” Reviewed 29 April 2015 We had a great time with the Eco-Charters team. We were fortunate enough to have a good shark day at the beginning of April. We the the last of the charter boats to arrive at Seal Island - the others were already anchored and had some shark activity so our captain decided to try and get a breaching attack - not usual for this time of year - and we were successful - not a full "airjaws" experience, but a great visual of the shark breaking the water to attack the decoy! The cage dive was fantastic - lots of action - and the regulator makes it really easy and in no way whatsoever caused the sharks to stay away. I would recommened this experience to anyone visiting Cape Town Visited April 2015

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Blue sharks

By | June 14th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

Blue sharks get their name from the beautiful blue colour of the skin on their back and sides. These sharks are extremely wide-ranging and can be found in both tropical and temperate seas, in waters between 7 and 16 degrees Celsius. They are also known for producing large litters of pups, between 4 and 135 pups at a time, with the number of pups determined by the size of the female. This species is usually found in deep waters, up to 350 metres and are considered a pelagic or blue water shark species. While out in the deep blue this species feeds mostly on fish species including cod, herring, hake and mackerel but have also been known to feed on whale carcasses and sea birds. As an opportunistic feeder these sharks have also been known to eat plastic and other marine pollution. These sharks can reach lengths up to 3.8 [...]

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Baby sharks and shark eggs

By | June 6th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

Many sharks lay eggs, called mermaids purses, which attach to marine vegetation or rocks, while others hatch inside the female and are live born. Species in which the eggs hatch inside the female often exhibit what is called intrauterine cannibalism, where shark pups still in the womb eat their siblings and other unfertilized eggs.  Others species, such as the great white shark, have pups that grow inside the female attached to the uterus, as in mammals, with gestation lasting anywhere from five months to two years. However sharks as a class of animals will never win a parent of the year award as baby sharks once born or hatched are left to fend completely for themselves. You can often find empty shark egg cases at the beach and you can usually tell which species it is from because different species produce different shaped egg cases. The baby sharks inside chew [...]

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Shark Teeth

By | June 6th, 2015|Tour Happening's|

The part that scares people most about sharks has got to be all those sharp and pointy teeth, but you can actually tell a lot about sharks based on their teeth.   Most well publicized are the serrated triangular upper teeth of great white sharks, perfect for tearing into their prey, the Cape fur seal. However what most people don’t know is that juvenile white sharks actually have small unserrated needle-like teeth more like those seen on ragged tooth, mako and bull sharks. Now you may wonder how and why that would be, the answer is simple, juvenile white sharks feed on different prey to their larger counterparts and have teeth perfectly adapted to do so. White sharks up to about 2.5 to 3.5 metres feed on fish mostly and thus need those shark pointed teeth to keep hold of those slippery fish and swallow them whole. Obviously as they [...]

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